If you take a moment to look around you and listen while you’re driving, traveling to work on the bus or walking through the city, you’ll probably come across warning lights or sirens of some description. Emergency vehicles are all around us, protecting us from danger and leaping to the rescue when things don’t quite go to plan. The vehicles you see attending crash scenes and house fires are designed to cope with all kinds of different environments and scenarios, and they are kitted out with state of the art equipment. One of the most important features of emergency vehicles is lighting. Lighting is essential for attracting attention, alerting drivers and pedestrians to danger and issuing warnings that promote safety. It also enables first responders to work around the clock. Emergency lighting is used widely, and it saves lives on a daily basis. Here is a run-down of vehicles that employ and benefit from the use of warning lights.

Police vehicles

Police officers undertake a diverse range of tasks, and as such, they use a broad spectrum of emergency lights. No two days are the same when you work in the police force, and you have to be prepared to react quickly to an ever-changing environment. Police use lights to control traffic, pursue people who may have committed crimes, undertake patrols and make areas safe for the public. To fulfil this eclectic range of roles, several types of lighting are employed. Some of the types of police lights that are used include:

LED light bars: LED light bars range in size from mini versions measuring up to 9 inches to full-size models that span 48 inches. LED light bars flood the area with light, making them ideal for officers who are attending road incidents or attempting to section off an area of the highway or a residential street to protect the public. You can attach light bars for permanent use, or you can pop them on and off, which is useful for volunteers or officers who operate undercover.

Hideaway LED strobe lights: sometimes, police need to be visible, but in other cases, remaining incognito is the name of the game. Hideaway lights are ideal for unmarked police vehicles, as they are incredibly small and discreet and they can be activated at the last moment.

Dash lights: dash lights are an excellent addition to police vehicles because they can provide additional light for working in the dark. Dash lights are easy to install, they can be activated incredibly quickly, and they’re discreet, making them suitable for all types of police vehicle and a range of different operations.

Police light bars are customizable, they work with other light systems and sirens and you can choose from various different colors. The most popular options for police vehicles are red, white and blue.

Police warning lights come in all kinds of different shapes and sizes and they enable officers to undertake jobs safely and effectively. Whether you’re patrolling the city streets, you’re in pursuit of lawbreakers, you’re managing traffic or you’re breaking up crowd trouble, there are lights out there can increase safety and enable you to do your job to the best of your ability.

Fire trucks

Firefighters risk their lives on a daily basis to extinguish flames and secure and protect homes and business premises, but they also undertake a host of additional jobs. The modern firefighter isn’t just required to hose burning buildings, and the job description goes way beyond conventional training. Firefighters are trained to assist with operations such as helping police and paramedics at the scene of road traffic accidents, managing toxic and hazardous materials, monitoring traffic and clearing debris from the road surface. As a firefighter, you want to feel confident that your vehicle has everything you need to do your job as best you can. Equipping your fire truck with emergency lighting is beneficial both for the crew and the public.

A fire truck is predominantly called into action to tackle blazes, but it also has to serve a range of other purposes. This is why fire trucks are fitted with a range of different emergency lighting options and why volunteer firefighters are often keen to invest in different types of warning light. Here are some of the most commonly used fire lights:

LED fire light bars: LED light bars are ideal for scenarios, which demand a lot of light. If you’re working in the dark, the light is fading or you’re tending to casualties on a foggy day, an LED light bar will provide the power you need to work effectively. You can choose from a range of sizes and you can customize the light bar to tackle different emergency scenarios. Full size light bars are often recommended for fire trucks due to their size and power output.

Grille and surface lights: grille and surface lights are ideal for volunteer firefighters who may not want to drive around with visible warning lights on their PVO. With these portable, functional lights, you can decide when and where you want to use the lights and when you’ve finished your shift, you can return to off-duty mode. These lights are also well suited to smaller auxiliary vehicles.

LED Visor lights: visor lights often prove to be a useful addition to fire trucks. Visor lights can provide an additional light source for helping injured people or fanning flames in the dark, but they can also be used as warning lights for managing traffic. Although this is predominantly a job undertaken by the police, fire crews may be called in to help with large-scale incidents and they can also provide additional assistance at the scene of crashes to help officers keep other drivers safe.

The look and sound of a firetruck are unmistakable. If you see a firetruck in the distance, you know that you need to move out of the way to let it through or pass it with extra care. Emergency lights fitted to fire vehicles play a range of important roles. Not only do they protect the public and encourage them to proceed carefully, but they also enable firefighters to work in almost any environment imaginable. The nature of this job means that individuals may encounter incredibly challenging surroundings, and emergency lights maximize the chances of a successful outcome.

Tow trucks

If you drive a tow truck, there’s a good chance that you’re going to be sharing the road with a large number of other vehicles. If you’re in the process of towing, you need to protect the vehicle on tow, keep your own vehicle safe and ensure that other drivers and pedestrians can see what you’re doing. Safety should always be a priority for any road user, and installing emergency lights on a tow truck is a surefire way to make the roads a safer place. Whether you’re on the road or you’ve pulled over at the side of the highway to assist a stranded motorist, it’s incredibly beneficial to make your presence known.

Tow trucks may be fitted with different types of emergency light bar to attract the attention of drivers, pedestrians and first responders. Here are some examples of the types of lights commonly employed by tow truck drivers:

Full size LED light bars: full size LED light bars emit powerful beams of light that illuminate vast areas surrounding the vehicle. LED light bars are ideal for towing, but they can also be incredibly useful for drivers attempting to load vehicles onto the truck, secure stranded vehicles and alert other drivers to the presence of obstacles in the road. Light bars come in a range of sizes, and you can customize the settings to suit the individual vehicle.

Dash and deck lighting: LED dash and deck lights are ideal for vehicles that operate at night. They provide additional light, which not only makes the road safer, but also enables tow truck drivers to see what they are doing. If there is limited light available, this can hinder your ability to help others and simultaneously put your safety at risk. Dash and deck lights are portable and versatile, as they can be fitted to almost any part of the truck.

Grille and surface mount lights: grille and surface lights are an incredibly useful addition to a tow truck’s lighting arsenal. These lights are built to withstand the elements, they’re robust, and they enable tow truck drivers to work in even the harshest, most challenging and unpredictable conditions. One of the most important uses of grille and surface lights is warning other road users of the presence of a tow truck at the side of a road. Safety is key when operating at night, and using grille and surface lights can help to protect workers in the road, as well as ensuring that other drivers know to avoid the immediate area.

If you’re a tow truck driver, your day job may require you to navigate everything from labyrinth-like inner city alleys to deserted country roads and everything in-between. Whether you’re towing a car in heavy traffic at rush hour or you’re trying to load a damaged vehicle onto the truck at the side of the road on a windy, wet winter’s day, there’s no doubt that emergency lighting makes a difference. With shining beacons of lights streaming from your vehicle, you can make the challenge easier for yourself while also making sure that others are aware of what you’re doing and where you’re going.

Construction vehicles

Construction vehicles are usually found on building sites. If trucks are confined to enclosed areas, there is a very low risk to the public, but if they’re involved in projects in public spaces or on the highways, it’s important that they are clearly visible at all times. Using emergency lighting can highlight obstacles and obstructions in carriageways and encourage pedestrians using the sidewalk to maintain a safe distance. Lighting is also essential to protect workers, especially where there is limited natural light available. If a truck is fitted with warning lights, this is going to increase safety for everyone in the area and make life easier for those attempting to carry out repairs or build new structures. Examples of emergency lights that are commonly used by construction vehicles include LED light bars (full size for trucks and tractors and mini light bars for auxiliary vehicles), visor lights and dash and deck lights.

Unmarked vehicles

Usually, warning lights are employed to draw attention to a vehicle, but as a first responder or an emergency volunteer, you don’t always want to be visible to others. Unmarked vehicles are often employed to pursue negligent or dangerous drivers, for example, in a high-speed chase on a highway, and they can also be used as part of undercover and surveillance operations. If you drive an unmarked vehicle, decking it out in visible warning lights defeats the object. The key is to focus on discretion and use lights that can be activated at short notice without giving the game away. Options like LED hideaway strobe lights and visor lights are ideal, as they cannot be spotted from outside of the vehicle, and they’re very easy to operate and customize. Grille lights are also a popular option for police vehicles, as they provide subtle lighting. Going undercover can increase the chances of a positive outcome.

First response bikes

Bikes are used by police forces and ambulance crews to provide a rapid response in emergency situations. Motorcycles can travel quicker than large trucks and ambulances, they can weave in and out of traffic and they may also be stationed closer to the scene of the incident. Traveling by bike can be dangerous at the best of times, but if you’re responding to a call and you’re driving at high speeds, the risk of injury is even greater. To protect yourself and those around you, it’s wise to use emergency lighting. Using a hideaway strobe light, pod lights and surface mount LEDs, you can alert others to your presence and light the way. When you arrive, you can also use your lights to illuminate the area to enable you to work quickly and safely.

Warning lights are used by a wide range of vehicles that pass through our cities and patrol our roads on a daily basis. The role of first responders changes constantly, and this is why the spectrum of lights for emergency vehicles is so broad. There are lights out there for every kind of vehicle that is charged with the responsibility of keeping us safe and coming to our rescue.